Two Years of Wonder (e-readers)

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twoyearswonderprint2.jpg

Two Years of Wonder (e-readers)

9.99

WINNER NAUTILUS AWARD - SILVER MEDAL 2018

WINNER INDEPENDENT PRESS AWARD - 2018

WINNER GOLD MEDAL - LITERARY TITAN AWARD - 2019

FINALIST NEXT GEN BOOK AWARDS - 2018 BEST MEMOIR

FINALIST SILVER FALCHION AWARD - 2019

FIVE STAR REVIEW FROM READERS' FAVORITE

September 25, 2012 Ted Neill picked up a knife to cut his wrists open and kill himself. Post hospitalization and treatment for major depressive disorder, he wrote Two Years of Wonder, a memoir based on his journey towards recovery. In it, he examines the experience that left him with such despair: living and working for two years at an orphanage for children with HIV/AIDS in Nairobi, Kenya.

Neill interweaves his story with the experiences of Oliver, Miriam, Ivy, Harmony, Tabitha, Sofie, Nea, and other children, exploring their own paths of trauma, survival, and resilience. In prose that is by turns poetic, confessional, and brutal, Neill with the children he comes alongside, strive to put the pieces of their fractured lives back together as they search for meaning and connection, each trying to reclaim their humanity and capacity to love in the face of inexplicable suffering and loss.

About the Author: In addition to his time living in Kenya, Ted Neill has worked for CARE and World Vision International in the fields of health, education, and child development. He has written for The Washington Post and published multiple novels. His share of proceeds from Two Years of Wonder are donated to the children featured in its pages as well as other Kenyan based organizations that support vulnerable children and youth.

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Praise from Amazon Reviews

 “A memoir that will both break your heart and give you hope.” 

“This author ministers to these sick and dying children and almost pays the ultimate price. This story is about the children, but it is also about a caregiver's descent into depression and his journey back. I loved it.”  

“Two Years of Wonder: A Memoir should spearhead a deeper awareness and appreciation of the sanctity of human life than has ever before been possible—may the work reach a wide audience across the continents. It certainly deserves to do so.”  

“In spite of its grim backdrop, Two Years of Wonder is really about hope and love. It's a great read.”  

“This is serious business, heart-wrenching material, and he brings a sense of humanity to it. These are not pages of statistics. These are real people. . .And the fact that royalties that the author receives will go to these children in need? Do you need more reasons to purchase this book?” 

 “This is a great story, and I highly recommend that it goes on everyone's "to read" list.”  

“Thank you Ted Neill, for helping me to understand the situation so much better. A great book my fellow readers and authors.” 

“The book is far more than a dry recounting of anecdotes and people . . .it is a pensive statement about the things that divide and/or connect us, such as barriers created by contrasting skin colors and levels of formal education, or the unavoidable commonality of human suffering...whether induced by a physical menace like HIV, or inner emotional turmoil.” 

  “In terms of the subject matter, I find that his raw and honest exposure of Africa’s HIV challenge reminded me of another book which explores some of the (albeit Apartheid-related) challenges in Africa: Cry the Beloved Country.”  “If you like thoughtful and reflective narratives about Africa, or interactions with the marginalized, this book is for you.”  

“The book is an honest look at the realities of poverty and injustice, particularly in developing countries, juxtaposed against the internal conflict the author experienced in his desire to help and his shame at feeling like just one more person with a privileged "white savior" complex. Neill writes about his personal struggle with severe depression in a way that is full of insight. His humility, sensitivity toward others, and genuine compassion come through in every word.”